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Learn About Cannabis

As Neil deGrasse Tyson discussed on the series Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey, Robert Hooke famously reported to the British Royal Society in 1689 that he had been experimenting with cannabis and that a sea captain friend of his "had so often experimented with it that there is no cause of fear, though possibly there may be of laughter." It may be of no surprise to find that sentiment in Cosmos, as Carl Sagan, author of the original Cosmos series, wrote in 1969, "The illegality of cannabis is outrageous, an impediment to full utilization of a drug which helps produce the serenity and insight, sensitivity and fellowship so desperately needed in this increasingly mad and dangerous world." Though our modern societies have been debating the acceptability of cannabis use, the safety and potential of this versatile plant has been well-known by humankind for thousands of years. Cannabis is evidenced to have been used as far back as 10,000 years ago for a wide variety of purposes such as using hemp for rope, clothing, and more. Archeologic evidence of it's medicinal use dates back 2,500 years. We understand the need for caution, but we also value evidence and changing our views with new information. That's why we here at Swahn Balanced Health endeavor to bring treatments that not only eliminate suffering, but are safe and improve quality of life. We find it baffling that the model of Western Medicine can condemn a substance with healing properties merely because it has pleasant psychoactive effects. It's time that drug policy shifts to focusing on harm reduction as it was intended to do and away from demonizing substances that are enjoyable while also improving lives.

Utah Medical Cannabis Qualifying Conditions

QUALIFYING CONDITIONS (26-61A-104) Individuals with the following conditions are authorized under the Utah Medical Cannabis Act to receive a medical cannabis patient card:

  • HIV or acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS)

  • Alzheimer’s disease

  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis 

  • Cancer

  • Cachexia

  • Persistent nausea that is not significantly responsive to traditional treatment except for nausea related to: pregnancy, cannabis-induced cyclical vomiting syndrome, or CBD hyperemesis syndrome

  • Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis

  • Epilepsy or debilitating seizures

  • Multiple sclerosis or debilitating muscle spasms

  • Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) that is being treated and monitored by a mental health therapist and that: has been diagnosed by a health care provider or mental health provider by the VA and documented in the patient’s record; or has been diagnosed or confirmed by evaluation by a psychiatrist, master’s level degree psychologist, a master’s level degree licensed clinical social worker, or a psych APRN

  • Autism

  • Terminal illness when the patient’s remaining life expectancy is less than 6 months

  • Condition resulting in the individual receiving hospice care

  • Rare condition or disease that affects less than 200,000 individuals in the U.S., as defined in federal law and this is not adequately managed despite treatment attempts using conventional medications (other than opioids or opiates) or physical interventions

  • Pain lasting longer than two weeks that is not adequately managed, in the qualified medical provider’s opinion, despite treatment attempts using conventional medications other than opioids or opiates or physical interventions9

  • If a patient does not have a qualifying condition specifically named in the law, they may petition the Compassionate Use Board (CUB) for approval of their medical cannabis card. CUB meetings are closed to the public, applicants, and medical providers.

Videos

How Does Marijuana Affect Your Brain (Length: 18:14)

Medical Cannabis Cardholder Application Process (Length 7:30)

The endocannabinoid system and the revolution of one | Rachel Knox | TEDxPortland (Length 15:48)

Why I changed my mind about medicinal cannabis | Hugh Hempel | TEDxUniversityofNevada (Length 14:25)

Stoners coming out – beyond the marijuana monster myths | David Schmader | TEDxRainier (Length 12:22)

Academic Literature

Amin, M. R., & Ali, D. W. (2019). Pharmacology of Medical Cannabis. In A. N. Bukiya (Ed.), Recent Advances in Cannabinoid Physiology and Pathology (pp. 151–165). Springer International Publishing. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-21737-2_8

Ko, G. D., Bober, S. L., Mindra, S., & Moreau, J. M. (2016). Medical cannabis - the Canadian perspective. Journal of pain research, 9, 735–744. https://doi.org/10.2147/JPR.S98182